Climate Refugee of Kutubdia Para Facing Crisis

published on:30/11/2013

Loss of life, land and poverties is rising very quickly at Cox’s Bazar district due to Climate changes. More than One lakh fifty thousand people of Cox’s Bazar have already been lost their home, home land, properties in the district during the last one hundred years. All the uprooted and landless people have already been migrated from their native village forever earlier. Those climate changes refugees have been taken shelter in different areas of the district and developed locality. More than forty thousand people of Kutubdia Island have already been taken shelter and build slams at Cox’s bazaar town. This slams is named `Kutubdia Para’ is situated on west side of Cox’s Bazar Air port.
Another ten thousand people of Kutubdia Island have already been taken shelter and build locality at Teknaf upazila named `Kutubdia para’ under hoykong union’. This migrant people facing several number of Socio economic crisis.see details

Erosion leaves Kutubdia Island

published on:26/11/2013
The once-treasured lighthouse on Kutubdia island is sinking due to rising sea levels and unabated erosion that has caused half the island to disappear in a matter of decades.

The once 60 sq km island has been reduced to a mere 25 sq km since the 1960’s, says Coast Trust executive director Rezaul Karim Chowdhury. Islanders are losing their centuries old homesteads, while rising population density—as the island’s more than 100,000 inhabitants are forced to occupy less and less land—gives rise to social and economic unrest.

SAARC Meteorological Research Centre (SMRC) also records the sea levels rising along the coast of Bangladesh.

An SMRC study pointed out that the sea level at Hiron Point in the Sundarbans, at the island of Char Chhenga and at Cox’s Bazaar are registering significantly increased tidal heights.

SMRC’s senior research officer Mizanur Rahman told bdnews24.com that with higher seas, salinity and coastal erosion was also increasing.

Farming, one of the two main livelihoods on the island—the other being fishing—is gradually being abandoned due to shrinking arable land, while people are made homeless refugees.see details

Cascade of Climate refugee in Jamalpur

Published on:11/11/2013

Erosion by the Jamuna River has taken a serious turn at four villages in Chinaduli union of Islampur upazila. Recently, the Jamuna river erosion threatened thousands of families at Islampur upazila in Jmalpur district. In the last month, the river erosion marked severe damage to lives and livelihoods while leaving people in danger. The badly affected unions are Kulkandi and Pathorshi. Pathorshi union has already been vanished to the river while Kulkandi is on the way to demolish.
Riverbank erosion is a perennial problem in Bangladesh. Large monsoon flow transporting extreme amounts of sediment from the Himalayan Mountains to the sea flow through the delta of Bangladesh formed by the same soils. These fine soils have no resistance to the flowing water and are easily transported and deposited. As a consequence the large rivers have quite an unpredictable behavior with the permanent risk of riverbank erosion. Riverbank erosion can exceed one kilometer per year and poses a substantial risk to floodplain dwellers. The loss of land is accompanied by a loss of infrastructure such as flood embankments, schools, hospitals, cultural and religious monuments and, of course, agricultural lands and assets.
According to BWDB It has been estimated that tens of thousands of people are displaced annually by river erosion in Bangladesh, possibly up to 100,000. From the 1970s to early the 1990s, the extent of mean annual erosion was about 3,300 hectares along both banks of the Jamuna River. During the last decade erosion along the river seems to have diminished slightly ranging from 1,000 to 2,500 hectare per year.see details

Indian govt to pilot climate change mitigation for agri sector in three states

Sandip Das

With recurrent floods, storms and erratic rainfall adversely impacting farmers and agricultural productivity, the government will soon commence pilot programmes in Jharkhand, Orissa and Chhattisgarh for climate change mitigation through district-level contingency plans.

An agriculture ministry official told FE that in the last three years 450 district-level contingency plans have been prepared to save agricultural crops from damage, and promote the usage of varieties of seeds which deal with erratic weather conditions.

“The effectiveness of these contingency plans would be tested through these pilots to be carried out in six districts in three states,” Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture (CRIDA) director B Venkateswarlu said. CRIDA is a Hyderabad-based body affiliated with the Indian Council for Agricultural Research (ICAR).

Initiated by the agriculture ministry through ICAR and the respective state agricultural universities, a complete district dossier has been prepared which is expected to help the administration in dealing with the vagaries of weather for protecting the crop.

During the next one year, contingency plans for 520 districts would be prepared, Venkateswarlu said. The district-specific documents have been prepared in collaboration with state agriculture universities and the dossiers provide steps to deal with weather-related eventualities.

“This is the most comprehensive initiative in dealing with eventualities in case of deficient rainfall and drought conditions across districts,” an agriculture ministry official said.

The official said farmers in coastal Andhra Pradesh and Orissa could manage to save their paddy crop this kharif season from the fury of cyclone-Phailin as they had sown submergence-tolerant varieties. Similarly in Bihar and Jharkhand, paddy nurseries were grown in a staggered manner, thereby providing seedlings to farmers in villages which faced delay in monsoons this year.

Venkateswarlu said in terms of dealing with drought and flood-related issues, agricultural scientists have developed various seed varieties for saving crops. “We have not developed adequate capability to deal with the impact of cyclones on the crop as there is a dearth of technology at present,” he observed.

CRIDA, which is coordinating the preparation of the contingency plans, has divided the country into five zones. Each district plan contains basic agricultural statistics, physical characteristics of the district (soil mapping) and details of the crops and methods of cultivation to be adopted in the case of exigencies.

Link:

http://www.financialexpress.com/news/govt-to-pilot-climate-change-mitigation-for-agri-sector-in-three-states/1197922/0

Dhaka Under pressure of Climate Refugee

Published on:20/11/2013

Climate change is driving an increasing number of Bangladeshis to migrate from rural areas to the cities, E&E reporter Lisa Friedman writes in “A City Exploding with Climate Migrants.” The article is part three of a special Climate Wire report on Bangladesh and climate migration. Friedman notes that some 500,000 people move to the capital, Dhaka, from coastal and rural areas each year – roughly the equivalent of the entire population of Washington, DC. Many of these people leave their homes because environmental factors have changed and they can no longer earn a living. Coastal flooding is occurring more frequently, destroying crops and rice fields that sustain villagers as saline water pushes further inland. Ferocious storms demolish homes and, in some cases, entire towns. Most of the migrants who come to Dhaka end up in the slums, home to an estimated 3.5 million people – 40 percent of the city’s population. According to the International Organization for Migration, some 70 percent of slum dwellers in Dhaka moved there after experiencing some kind of environmental hardship.see details

Government try to Establish Coal Based Power plant at Rampal only for the political Interest

Published on: 2013-11-02
Greenbarta.com
Coal fired power plants are the biggest source of man made CO2 emissions. This makes coal energy the single greatest threat facing our climate. So most of the Bangladeshi political Parties, Civil Society and environmental organization express their deep concern to save Sunderban. Bangladeshi Forest Expert Zunaed Kabir Chawdhury summarized his research was to highlight the Sunderban 38 crore every 3 years are given the protection of life and property. And another Experts say that the establish Coal based power plant at the nearer of Sundarban will be the suicide decision. Local Farmers accused government that this power plant only for the financial purpose of the rolling party politician. see the link Government try to Establish Coal Based Power plant at Rampal only for the political Interest

Rampal Coal-based Power Plant: The destruction of the South western Part of Bangladesh

Published on:06-11- 2013
Rampal Coal-Based plant, which is too set to produce 1,320 megawatt of electricity, is set to force the government of Bangladesh to acquire 1,834 acres of land, significantly consisting of farming lands, fisheries and habitations of the population of dependent on the mentioned. Over 95 per cent of the allocated land is capable of being harvested thrice a year that every year produced 1,285 tonnes of rice and 561.41 metric tonnes of fish. Over 8,000 families are permanent residents of the allocated land and among them 7,500 families live on the mentioned farming and fisheries. The Rampal plant is going to force these families off their homes and incomes. Its create force migrant people of the world. And its direct impacts on Sundarban and the Fisheries. Rampal Coal-based Power Plant: The destruction of the South western Part of Bangladesh

Farmers in north Pakistan valley welcome warmer climate, experts fret

By Saleem Shaikh 
Tue, 8 Oct 2013
AlertNet Climate, Thomson Reuters Foundation

Farmer Shehla Hayat describes how the abrupt shift from summer to winter in the Hunza-Nagar valley in Pakistan’s Upper Indus Basin has become a problem for vegetable and fruit farmers like her. TRF/Saleem Shaikh

KARIMABAD, Pakistan (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – In the mountains of northern Pakistan, some farmers say rising temperatures are giving them bumper harvests, even as climate and agricultural experts worry about the consequences of warming for the glaciers that are vital for the country’s irrigation.

“Many years back, the weather used to remain cold and cloudy most of the year. But now we have (more) warm months that are helping our staple, cash and fruit crops to grow faster and longer, and post higher yields,” said Sultan Khan, a farmer in Karimabad, a village in the picturesque Hunza valley of Gilgit-Baltistan province.

Farmers in Hunza say maize never used to grow taller than 3 feet (1 metre) during its five-month season (June to October). But a longer growing period and warmer days are helping the stalks reach up to 7 feet (2 metres). The maize yield has increased by an estimated 20-25 percent, they add, and harvests of other crops are also bigger.

Nonetheless, farmers in this remote area also complain that a lack of government guidance has left them uncertain as to whether to adjust their planting schedules to take advantage of the earlier onset of summer, since they do not know if the changes in weather patterns are permanent.

The Hunza valley perches on the north side of the Hunza River in the Upper Indus Basin, some 675 km (420 miles) from Islamabad, Pakistan’s capital. The valley lies at an elevation of around 2,500 metres (8,200 feet) and is surrounded by much higher mountain peaks and glaciers.

LESS SNOW

Ali Madad, a 76-year-old farmer in Barashal village, said that because of warmer temperatures, glaciers are melting more consistently, which makes his livelihood easier. “Now the streams, which are a major source of irrigation for mountain agriculture, flow even in winter,” he said.

Whereas snow used to begin falling in the valley around mid-October and continue for six months, it now begins in late December and ends a couple of months later, he added.

Temperatures that would fall as low as minus 16 degrees Celsius a dozen years back now rarely drop below minus 2 degrees. Summer, previously a three-month season, has become correspondingly longer, Madad said.

In Karimabad, Sultan Khan observed that winter snowfall is now less than 5 inches, in sharp contrast with the 13 inches or more typical a decade ago.

Local agriculture expert Fida Karim said only the mountain peaks now get covered with snow in winter, while the middle and lower latitudes hardly receive any snowfall. Rakaposhi, a spectacular peak in the Karakoram mountain range and the twelfth highest in Pakistan, has not been completely covered in snow since 2008, he added.

According to Karim, over the last five years, the winter snowfall in the valley has melted in just a few weeks in March. It used to remain until at least the end of April.

The changes experienced by farmers in the Hunza valley are different from those happening elsewhere in Gilgit-Baltistan. In other parts of the province, the winter season both begins and ends later than it used to, delaying the snow melt needed for irrigation and stunting the growth of crops.

But even in the Hunza valley, the changes in the onset of the seasons are a problem for vegetable and fruit farmers like Shehla Hayat.

“Every year in October, the shift from summer to winter used to be gradual. But for the last four years each October, hotter summer days (have) become cooler abruptly,” the 35-year-old farmer said, while harvesting fodder outside her house in Barashal village.

The sudden plunges in temperature, together with unexpected rainfall, have badly affected local crops of apples, apricots, pears and potatoes when they were nearly ripe, causing losses for farmers, Hayat said.

GLACIER MELT FEARS

Climate and agricultural experts warn, meanwhile, that the long-term consequences of the rising temperatures and glacial melt could be dire.

Inayat Karim, a mountain farming conservationist at the Baltit Rural Support Organisation in Hunza valley, said the Ultar glacier, which looms over Karimabad to a height of 7,400 metres (24,300 feet), has been shrinking since 1999, and a previously snow-covered peak is now bare.

Shahana Khan of the Aga Khan Rural Support Programme said the valley now receives rain as well as snow in the winter months.

“This points to a scary scenario for sustainable flows of the Hunza River,” Khan said, pointing out that declining snowfall will eventually reduce levels in the Hunza River, which accounts for 25-30 percent of the water that flows into the Indus River – in turn vital to much of the nation’s agricultural economy.

There are short-term problems for the Hunza River too. Farmers say it has become increasingly turbulent in recent years due to increased glacial melt in the summer months, which sometimes causes it to breach its banks.

The director general of the Pakistan Meteorological Department, Arif Mahmood, is concerned by the retreating snowline in the high mountains.

“In the past, mountains in the valleys like Gilgit, Hunza, Skardu and Shigar in the Upper Indus Basin (UIB) used to receive huge snow in their lower altitude areas, between 2,000 and 3,000 metres. But this is no more the case,” he said.

“There has been a surge in heat wave incidences in UIB areas,” Mahmood continued. “The temperature now goes up beyond 40 degrees Celsius in summer as compared to (an earlier) maximum of 28 degree Celsius some 10 years ago.”

There has also been an unusual shift in monsoon patterns, which are becoming heavier and moving to higher altitudes, he added.

Mahmood warned of increasing flash floods and landslides in the UIB region if temperature increases continue.

The senior weather official called for urgent action to make public infrastructure more climate-resilient, such as strengthening river banks and bridges, and to introduce new crop varieties. Otherwise, local communities will be increasingly threatened by torrential rains, floods and wildfires, he warned.

Weblink: http://www.trust.org/item/20131008081530-fy7qp/