Ancient Kings Fight Climate Change – IPS

As erratic climate patterns take hold, researchers say that ancient  reservoirs built hundreds of years back, can serve to minimize flood waters and as receptacles for water during harsh droughts. http://www.ipsnews.net/2013/08/ancient-kings-fight-climate-change/

Could Sri Lanka get irrigation boost from ancient reservoirs? – IRIN

One way Sri Lanka can better manage its water resources in the face of changing monsoon patterns is through centuries-old water reservoirs, experts say.

Experts at the Colombo-based International Water Management Institute (IWMI) say one way to ease fluctuating rice harvests (due to increasingly erratic monsoon seasons) is to use thousands of ancient small irrigation reservoirs spread out in the Northern, North Central, Eastern, North Western and Southern provinces. – http://www.irinnews.org/report/98503/could-sri-lanka-get-irrigation-boost-from-ancient-reservoirs

As extreme weather hits harvests, food buffers could help – Thomson Reuters Foundation

As extreme weather events keeping increasing in frequency, Sri Lanka’s harvest keeps fluctuating. Now experts say that the country should look at seriously using buffer stocks. “If you want to tackle this problem, then you have to change as fast as climate is changing, preferably faster,” said L.P. Rupasena, deputy director of research at the Hector Kobbekaduwa Agrarian Training and Research Institute in Colombo. – http://www.trust.org/item/20130724100422-sv5zd/?source=hptop

Sri Lanka disaster stocks dangerously low – IRIN

Disaster relief stocks across Sri Lanka are dangerously low, experts and officials warn.

“There are gaps we need to fill, especially on stocks like tents and medicines that cannot be procured at short notice,” Sarath Lal Kumara, assistant director of the Disaster Management Centre (DMC), the main government body tasked with early warning and relief work, told IRIN.  – http://www.irinnews.org/report/98458/sri-lanka-disaster-stocks-dangerously-low

Need for better storm warnings in Sri Lanka – IRIN

There is a dire need inSri Lankafor an effective early warning system and building of public awareness on extreme weather events’ related alerts and warnings. The early warning mechanism that was set up after the 2004 tsunami is focused on issuing tsunami warnings and experts warn that erratic monsoon and frequent extreme weather events dictate similar attention should be paid to other natural hazards. http://www.irinnews.org/report/98346/need-for-better-storm-warnings-in-sri-lanka

Ancient irrigation reservoirs vital amid erratic monsoon rains in Sri Lanka – Thomson Reuters Foundation

Sri Lanka has been increasingly witnessing erratic rain patterns that have had a debilitating  impact on the country’s vital agriculture production. Now research has shown that centuries old irrigation schemes spread wide in the rural areas can be used as a workable solution to the vagaries of these shifting rain patterns. – http://www.trust.org/item/20130702101105-pvwac/?source=hptop

Climate Change to Determine Economic Growth – Inter Press News Service

A new World Bank report  entitled ‘Turn Down The Heat: Why a 4°C Warmer World Must be Avoided’, detailing how global warming could affect sub-Saharan Africa and South and Southeast Asia shows “the likely impacts of present day two-degree and four-degree-Celsius warming on agricultural production, water resources, and coastal vulnerability for affected populations.” [http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/climatechange]

South Asia with a population expected to at 2.2b by 2050 is at a particularly high risk. Here is one example – ““With a temperature increase of two to 2.5 degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels, by the 2050s reduced water availability for agricultural production may result in more than 63 million people no longer being able to meet their caloric demand by production in the river basins (of the Indus, Ganges, and Brahmaputra),”.

Read more at http://www.ipsnews.net/2013/06/climate-change-to-determine-economic-growth/

In Sri Lanka, the Tempest Comes Unannounced – Inter Press News Service

Early warning lags in Sri Lanka have proved fatal twice in the last 20 months for fishing communities along the south and western coasts. Twice, in November 2011 and June 2013, shallow water fishermen found themselves battling for their lives when the seas turned nasty suddenly. Like one survivor described, when the waves rose up and the sea howled   like a deranged monster. The latest tragedy at least has made the government take note and may be some good will come about. – http://www.ipsnews.net/2013/06/in-sri-lanka-the-tempest-comes-unannounced/